Saturday, March 17, 2012

Let's Get This Party Started

After five long years . . .
          the day has finally come. . . .
                   "The Sword of Senack" has been released!!!

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Please click this picture if you'd like to buy the eBook for 99 cents 
or the physical copy that's currently on sale!


    This book is just over 300 pages long and it includes some phenomenal artwork.  I'm so proud for it to be released.
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    The official kick-off will be Tuesday, March 20th.  I'm hoping for a huge turnout.  If you'd like to write something about this on a post, please let me know and I'll include a link to your blog on my launch post.  
    I'm getting excited because on the 20th I'm also holding a contest to give away a kindle fire!



    The Senack Art and Writing Contest is still going on.  Remember, the prizes are great and Wayman Publishing is even offering a chance at publication!  Click here for more info about that: Contest  
    But the exciting news doesn't end there.  I've been published in a magazine called Literary Lunes.  I got a slot on Journal Jabber--a radio station--and will be interviewed on 4/24.  I will also be speaking to the upper grades of a large elementary school on 3/28--how awesome is that?!  It will be videotaped and if all goes well, I'll put a few minutes of the talk on my blog.  
    It'll be great to speak to those kids.  I'm giving away some books and bookmarks.  One of my friends is a fantastic artist and she designed these for the kids.

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the back
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Here's how they work.
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    Anyway, some exciting things ahead.
    If you'd like to read an excerpt of my book.  I'm sharing one today and another next week.  Here goes . . .

Part of
Chapter One
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"You’re serious? You aren’t playing or pretending, are you?" I asked. A chill ran the length of my arm as I reached down and held my little sister's hand. She was so little. I’d never seen her that terrified.
     "I knew you’d understand."
     I didn’t believe all she said—at least not the part about magic or her meeting a witch. But I did think she’d talked to someone.
     "We need to tell Mom and Dad," I said.
     "No." Indy’s face went white. "She said if I told Dad, she’d kill me."
     "Indy," I hugged her, "I won’t let anyone hurt you. How would she know if you told him anyway?"
     "I already said—" As she spoke, someone hammered on the door. "—she’s a witch." To me the knocking was the kind that could make dead people come back to life and living people die.
     "Indy, let’s go get Mom and Dad."
     She shook her head. "You go. I’m too scared to leave the room."
    I ran to get my parents, but couldn’t find them anywhere in the huge castle. "Mom? Dad?" I yelled. Another knock echoed through the hallways. I had the strangest premonition—I had to be with Indy. I ran, backtracking as fast as I could.
     From the end of the hall, I saw Indy step from her room. She stared at the front door. It was already ajar, and although I’d told her not to, Indy went closer.
     "NO!" I screamed, still at a distance.
     "Indy," a voice cut the air. "Indy, I’ve come for you." My little sister shuddered as the door flew open fully. Rain spilled onto the castle’s slate floors and dampened her clothes.
     A beautiful woman stood in the doorway. "Come with me, sweet Indy," she crooned. "Come into the ocean."

    Shuddering, Indy looked back at me. "Goodbye," she mouthed. Then she turned and stepped mechanically toward the woman.
     "No, Indy! No! You can’t!" I raced outside, but as I neared the boulders by the shore, my legs refused to move.
     The woman scowled at me before murmuring, "My, but you do look like your great grandfather. I hate reunions."
     I tried yelling, but my voice magically froze. My arms turned stiff as hardened clay. The witch—for that had to be who she was—guided Indy closer to the water. As if in a trance, Indy followed.
     Overhead, the sky swirled gray. The ocean’s angry waves battered the blackened shore. Indy stepped leadenly across the jagged rocks, her head turning neither left nor right. I wanted to tell her I loved her, that she should come back, that I’d listen to all her stories about witches and magic. But I could neither speak nor move.

     I screamed within my mind, praying for help. Rain pelted my face, the face of an eleven-year-old failure. There I stood, unable to help anyone—even myself.
     Indy seemed intent on the woman at her side, intent on letting the ocean swallow her. "Come," the witch crooned again. Her voice drifted back to me even though she was far away. "You must come into the ocean," she whispered to my little sister.
     Indy paused for a moment. But the spell was too strong; she stepped into the waves. When she did, a pulse rippled from her foot and ran far away. The waves ate at the hem of her clothes and then her sleeves.
     My mind screamed even as my mouth couldn’t form the words.
    Indy’s chest went under the water, then her neck, her chin. I cried as her head went slowly, ever so gently under the waves. That was the worst moment of my life—the moment my sister disappeared.
     Before she too disappeared, the woman, that green-eyed witch, turned to me. Her lips greedy. "I’ll be back for you," she said. "For all of you." 
 


Go here for "The Sword of Senack" Paperback


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